View Single Post
      07-12-2013, 11:10 AM   #21
Rick F.
Lieutenant Colonel
Rick F.'s Avatar
789
Rep
1,869
Posts

Drives: 2013 BMW 335i cabriolet
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Catonsville, MD

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by dazed^ View Post
Awesome as usual, thanks for sharing.

I wondered at the statement that "kill" is a Dutch name for a stream, because I've never heard of that before. In modern-day Dutch at least, one would say "beek", "stroom", or "rivier"; no name resembling "kill" comes to mind. Anyway.
dazed,

Glad you enjoyed the report!

Regarding "kill," I wasn't sure what it meant so I looked it up on the always-accurate Internet… Apparently it comes from "Middle Dutch" (1150-1500), so I'm not surprised that it doesn't translate currently. Check out kill (body of water) on Wikipedia.

The modern Dutch word "beek" reminds me of a story. When my wife and I first went to England, we decided it would be fun to hike from the town of Haworth to the setting for Emily Brontė's Wuthering Heights. We had directions in a little pamphlet. After a couple of miles, however, the guidance was to "follow the beck." Well, we had no idea what a "beck" was!

We later learned that a beck is a stream. We had followed the stream, since there wasn't anywhere to cross, and it all worked out well. Thankfully, it was a beautiful day on Haworth Moor, and no sudden "wuthering" showed up.

Rick